Local Realtors achieve ‘Green Designation’

PORTSMOUTH — Tami Mallett and Robert Viel with Bean Group have been awarded the National Association of Realtors’ Green Designation, the only green real estate professional designation recognized by NAR.

Mallett and Viel achieved this prestigious designation after completing topic-specific course work designed specifically for Realtors. The designation courses were created in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team of industry experts from across the country; ensuring designees gain comprehensive knowledge of green homes and issues of resource-efficiency in relation to real estate and home owners.

More specifically, Mallett and Viel were trained in understanding what makes a property green, helping clients evaluate the cost/benefits of resource-efficient features and practices, distinguishing between industry rating and classification systems, listing and marketing green homes and buildings, discussing the financial grants and incentives available to homeowners, and understanding how buyer and seller preferences may be inspired by resource-efficiency.

“Living green is about making healthy choices that are also easy on your wallet,” said Marc Gould, vice president of NAR’s Green Designation. “NAR Green Designees have the necessary resources and relationships to effectively work with you to find your next home or assess your next green project.”

NAR’s Green Designation was developed in response to growing consumer awareness of the benefits of resource-efficient homes and buildings. The designation helps consumers understand the positive impact of home performance and identify Realtors who can help them realize their green real estate and lifestyle goals.

As NAR Green designees, Mallett and Viel have gained the knowledge and the tools necessary to become a trusted green resource for the Greater Seacoast of New Hampshire. 

For more information about Mallett, visit www.tamimallett.com or e-mail tami.mallett@beangroup.com. For more information about Viel, visit www.bobviel.com or email bobviel@comcast.net.

For more about NAR’s Green Designation, visit www.greenresourcecouncil.org.

National Association of Realtors advises agents and brokers on legal marijuana

When it comes to marijuana, there’s a crosshatch of laws that real estate brokers and their agents must navigate. The drug is illegal under federal law, but 30 states and Washington, D.C., allow medical use of marijuana.Eight states allow recreational use of marijuana (Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington).So what’s a broker to do if one of his or her agents asks to consume on the job for medical reasons? Or if a broker or agent is a property manager, when a tenant asks to light up?
When agents want to use pot
Because marijuana is still illegal at the federal level, federal law does not require an employer to accommodate an employee’s marijuana usage, according to the National Association of Realtors in one of its recent “Window to the Law” videos.Real estate brokerages should be aware of their state laws, NAR Senior Counsel Finley Maxson advised. Eight states don’t allow employers to discriminate against employees who h…

With National Flood Insurance Program Expiring in Six Months …

WASHINGTON, March 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — On September 30, just six months from today, the National Flood Insurance Program will expire. The National Association of Realtors®is working closely with federal regulators and members of Congress to strengthen the program and clear the way for a private market to take hold; NAR has also issued a series of principles to improve access and affordability for consumers.  

But Realtors® warn the program’s September 30 reauthorization deadline is a threat to consumers.


Troubled Waters - Sound the Alarm

Troubled Waters – Sound the Alarm


NAR President William E. Brown, a second-generation Realtor® from Alamo, California and founder of Investment Properties, believes that expiration would deal significant damage to current policy-holding property owners, as well as threaten property sales and the broader housing market.

Brown said that Realtors® see the NFIP’s importance every day in their lives and in their business and made the following statement:

“When the NFIP expired in 2010, over 1,300 home sales were disrupted every day as a result. That’s over 40,000 every month. Flood insurance is required for a mortgage in the 100-year floodplain, but without access to the NFIP, buyers simply couldn’t get a mortgage or vital protection from the No. 1 cause of loss of property and life: flooding.

“This problem affects far more than coastal communities, and prospective homeowners aren’t the only ones at risk. Policyholders in over 22,000 communities across the country depend on the NFIP to protect homes and businesses from torrential rain, swollen rivers and lakes, snowmelt, failing infrastructure, as well as storm surges and hurricanes. When that lifeline is cut off, the NFIP can’t issue new policies or renew existing residential or commercial policies that expire. That means current home and business owners may find their most important asset unprotected.

“Last year was the third largest claims payout year in NFIP’s history, costing more than $4 billion. While there were five billion-dollar floods, including Hurricane Matthew, four of the five were inland, and the largest single event was in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in August, just one year out from the NFIP’s expiration date.

“The NFIP isn’t perfect, and reforms are needed. We will continue working closely with everyone involved to achieve those reforms.

“Good work has been done in Congress, at FEMA and elsewhere to clear the way for those efforts. We thank leaders on both sides of the aisle for all they’ve done up to this point. Now, it’s time for action. Congress has six months to do the right thing and pass a long-term reauthorization of the program. We’re hoping they do just that.”

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org. This and other news releases are posted in the “News, Blogs and Video” tab on the website. 

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/with-national-flood-insurance-program-expiring-in-six-months-realtors-sound-the-alarm-300431931.html

SOURCE National Association of Realtors

Related Links

http://www.realtor.org

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Montgomery County real estate briefs: Week of April 9

Re/Max office welcomes sales agent

RE/MAX Services welcomes Nancy Verruto as a sales agent for Rich McIlhenny’s Blue Bell office.

Verruto was previously co-founder and executive director of MedEx Scribes, a health care company. Prior to this, she served as a project management consultant in various industries including investments, strategy and fund raising. Active in the community, Verruto was on the founding board of Paines Park in Philadelphia and has held board positions with the Germantown Historical Society and the Pink Ribbon Committee at the University of Pennsylvania.

“I am honored to be joining such a well-respected and talented real estate agent as Richard McIlhenny and look forward to bringing energy and enthusiasm to my new role,” Verruto said. “I will serve as an advocate for all of my clients and am honored to help them create the life they want to live next.”

McIlhenny and Verruto specialize in real estate sales in Northwest Philadelphia and Montgomery County.

Realtors with Re/Max Services are members of the Montgomery County Association of Realtors, the Pennsylvania Association of Realtors and the National Association of Realtors.

Berkshire Hathaway honors sales associates

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox Roach, Realtors salutes sales associates in the Blue Bell office for being the office leaders for the month of February.

The Linda Baron Team has been recognized for volume and units. Baron, CRS, ABR, e-Certified, ASR, relocation and luxury and fine homes specialist, is a recipient of the Top of the Rock, Chairman’s Circle Diamond and Legend awards. She resides in Gwynedd.

The Steven Kim Team has been recognized for listings. Licensed since 2001, Kim, associate broker, MCNE, ABR, CNHS, VCS, LHS, e-Certified, is a recipient of the Chairman’s Circle and Legend awards. He resides in Blue Bell.

Sales associates in the Collegeville office have also been honored for being the office leaders for the month of February.

The Megan Goldstein and Joe Dudek Team has been recognized for units and volume. Goldstein, CRS, SRS, licensed since 2001, and Dudek, ABR, CRS, CSP, GRI, SRS, SRES, relocation specialist, licensed since 1991, are recipients of the Chairman’s Circle Gold and Chairman’s Circle Platinum awards. Goldstein is a 13-year resident of Limerick, and Dudek is a lifetime resident of Pottstown.

Laurie Curran has been recognized for listings. Licensed since 2000, Curran, ABR, CRS, GRI, SRES, is a recipient of the Honor Society and Leading Edge Society awards. She is a six-year resident of Gilbertsville.

Local Realtor promoted within Coldwell Banker

David Krieger, president of Coldwell Banker Preferred, announced Maple Glen resident H. Daniel Caparo has been promoted to vice president of strategic growth for Coldwell Banker Preferred.

In this newly created position, Caparo will be responsible for pursuing expansion opportunities in the Greater Philadelphia area for the company.

“Dan has been an integral part of Coldwell Banker Preferred since he affiliated with the company as a sales professional 30 years ago. Since then, he has been promoted to various management positions where he has been instrumental in the success of the company,” Krieger said. “Dan’s first-hand real estate sales and management experience, combined with his understanding of the needs of our sales associates and that of our customers and clients, makes him well-positioned to lead the company in seeking opportunities for growth.”

As a successful real estate professional, Caparo was named Rookie of the Year in 1992 and was recognized with the Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle award designation from 1994 to 2002. He caught the attention of the leadership team and was promoted in 1996 to branch manager of the Conshohocken office. During his tenure, the Conshohocken office was recognized for its strong performance. Since 1998, Caparo has been a partner in the company.

From 2008 to 2012, he served as district branch manager of both the Conshohocken and Blue Bell offices and then remained branch vice president of the Blue Bell office until present. During his tenure as branch vice president of the Blue Bell office, Caparo delivered steady performance with the office earning recognition within NRT as a consistent performer since 2013 among the top 20 percent of all NRT offices nationwide. In addition, Caparo has earned personal designation to the NRT President’s Council for multiple years as a leading manager. NRT is the parent company of Coldwell Banker Preferred.

“It has been a privilege to work with such an outstanding group of real estate professionals in the Blue Bell office. I will truly miss the everyday camaraderie and the productive, enthusiastic professional environment,” said Caparo. “I am honored to have this wonderful opportunity to expand my leadership role and I am looking forward to strengthening Coldwell Banker Preferred’s position in the marketplace.”

Caparo is a member of the National Association of Realtors and has achieved the Accredited Buyer’s Representative, Certified Real Estate Brokerage Manager, Graduate Realtor Institute, Senior Real Estate Specialist and Certified Residential Specialist designations and ePRO certification.

A 1991 graduate of Villanova University, Caparo resides in Maple Glen with his wife, Tina, and daughter, Taylor.

Agent first in Oklahoma City to win National Association of Realtors’ 30 Under 30 Award

It had been a long day already, with a neighborhood meeting stretching it into the evening, but when Jessica Thompson finally got home that night in January, she wasn’t done.

She had a video to make — to explain herself.

“I was literally wearing this jacket,” she recalled, plucking at the sporty jacket in question, “my laptop propped open, and I just pressed ‘play.’ ”

For the next few minutes, she talked about her intense involvement with the Classen Ten Penn neighborhood, where she lives and focuses most of her real estate mojo, and shared her conviction that real estate professionals need to be involved in their own neighborhoods.

They live in them, she explained to the web camera, they know firsthand what’s going on in them, and they can build relationships with their neighbors.

And then she submitted the recording to the National Association of Realtors.

Thompson, 27, was vying for recognition in the association’s 30 Under 30 Awards, an annual who’s who of young real estate pros that draws contenders from across the country.

She downplayed her chances initially, especially after checking out the competition online and finding so many videos with high production values and sales volumes to match.

But then she made the first cut. She also noticed a pattern.

Rich niche

“Most of those people with the nice videos said the same thing over again: ‘I work great with my buyers and my sellers.’ ‘I have a high sales volume.’ I mean, that was repeated over and over again,” Thompson said. “And I was thinking, ‘Maybe I do have a chance, because I have a special niche that I’ve tapped into, and it sets me apart from these other Realtors.’ ”

In late March, months after that late-night recording session and just days after giving birth to her second child, she was proved right. Thompson, an agent with Loxwood Real Estate, 5009 N Pennsylvania, Suite 101, had made the 2017 Class of 30 Under 30.

She was the first 30 Under 30 Award winner from the Oklahoma City Metro Association of Realtors and only the second for the state as a whole. The National Association of Realtors will publish profiles of Thompson and the others in its May/June magazine.

“I was really impressed and grateful for everyone who did vote for me,” she said. “In the back of my head, I’m thinking, ‘Man, I’ve worked really hard to get where I am today with my neighborhood and my sales within my neighborhood.’ All I could think was, ‘I hope I get this. I really hope I get this, that the judges comprehend all the care I have for the area. Not just for the houses, but for the actual people.’ ”

Warm mix

It seems fitting that Thompson, who was working as a pharmacy tech less than five years ago, might take on a neighborhood like Classen Ten Penn with the tenacity she has.

For one thing, the neighborhood — from NW 10 north to NW 16 and from Classen Boulevard west to Pennsylvania Avenue — is home. She and husband, Anthony Thompson, bought a house there in 2010 with help from a Community Action Down Payment Assistance program. It’s where they intend for their newborn son, Henry Gray, and 3-year-old daughter, Olivia, to grow up.

Their family is folded into a neighborhood that feels more like a community, probably not what their peers might find in the suburbs but one familiar to anyone who grew up in a small town.

Hybrid cars do dot the streets, and some of the people in line outside nearby Nic’s Grill probably weren’t even born when the tiny eatery at 1201 N Pennsylvania opened its doors in the mid-1990s.

But neighbors greet neighbors here, old-timers and newcomers alike. Even a rogue pooch, marching confidently down a sidewalk one recent afternoon, gets called out by a man working in his front yard. “Does your family know you’re out?” he asks as the dog stops and cocks his head.

The warmth of the mix appeals to a generation raised in suburbs distant in more ways than one.

“We really were looking for a community,” said Lacy Kelly, 30, who moved into the neighborhood with Matt Fong in 2013. “I grew up in Edmond, in the suburbs, where nobody knows their neighbor — you drive into your two-car garage and go right into the house. So it’s been really awesome, for me, getting to know my community here in Classen Ten Penn.”

Close to downtown

The neighborhood, like many in Oklahoma City, cropped up near the interurban streetcar tracks in the first half of the 20th century. It offered a quick trek to work for the young people who moved in at the time. Its fortunes have risen and fallen over the century.

Back on the upswing, Classen Ten Penn is once again appealing to young adults.

“I moved out from California, and I had an hour and a half commute each way. I never wanted to do that again,” said Fong, 33, a former San Francisco Bay Area resident.

Kelly and Fong live close enough to their jobs downtown that they can commute there by bus, car or bike.

“Having those options is amazing,” Fong said.

But for Thompson, Classen Ten Penn is also a mission. Since she moved in seven years ago, both she and her neighborhood have seen their share of changes. Thompson got involved with the neighborhood association, which has served as a springboard to the kind of community activism that can change a person’s life.

And it did. Her work prompted her to delve into real estate — and she’s never looked back.

Surging market

“My neighborhood is my focus,” she said. “I feel like I’m not just a Realtor, though. If I have a buyer or seller who needs anything, I try to help.”

Education is part of that mission. She has listed six homes in the area, no mean feat in a low-income neighborhood with 68 percent rentals. But she’s constantly educating homebuyers and homeowners alike in programs that can help them buy and revitalize their homes. It’s had an effect.

“As the years have gone by, every time a new house enters the market in our neighborhood, we always ooh and aah over how much houses are going for now,” she said. “It’s just gotten so high that I’m in shock sometimes to see how much growth this neighborhood has seen.”

She didn’t sell Fong and Kelly their first Classen Ten Penn home in 2013. But when a circa-1922 Craftsman home was coming on the market in 2016, one she thought was perfect for them, she let them know and acted as their agent.

Once the original woodwork and fixtures caught their heart and they made an offer, Thompson helped the previous owner, another friend, move out. Then she helped Fong and Kelly sort out the furniture left behind and paint their new place.

More than socializing

Beyond the walls, though, Thompson has worked in unison with neighbors to mold Classen Ten Penn into a community that takes care of its own. Events such as the upcoming Easter egg hunt bring everyone together, but efforts go beyond simple socializing.

When teachers at Eugene Field Elementary, the neighborhood school, told a group of neighbors that many parents couldn’t get involved with their children’s studies because of language barriers, they organized free ESL classes (English as a second language) that immediately filled up.

“And when parents would come out of those classes, they’d just be smiling,” Thompson said.

And when budget cuts forced the school to pick music classes over art, a neighborhood group worked with Current Studio, a nearby experimental art space at 1218 N Pennsylvania, to put together an art curriculum to help fill the void.

It all comes back to a saying Thompson remembers hearing as a student at Putnam City High School: Be the change you want to see in the world.

“For me, I wanted there to be change in my neighborhood, and it took action,” she said. “And it happened.”

“And sometimes,” echoed Kelly, “it’s as simple as meeting your neighbor.”

You might also be interested in…

Realtors: If You See ‘NAR: Urgent Update’ In Your Inbox, Hit Delete

For most professionals, a sizeable chunk of the day is spent hurriedly opening, reading and replying to emails, sometimes without giving much thought to the validity and safety of those messages. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) is seeking to change that with its latest warning about a possible phishing scam targeting NAR members.

The email, entitled “NAR: Urgent Update,” comes from no-reply@nar.realtor, and asks that “all registered realtors are hereby advised to view the recent publication released.”

In order to view the release, users are asked to click a link and enter a password.

The intent of the scam isn’t yet known, but NAR is asking all members to immediately delete the email and warn others of this and other possible phishing attempts.

NAR Association Counsel Jessica Edgerton wrote a lengthy blog post about how Realtors can protect buyers from phishing scams, but there’s plenty of helpful tips on how agents can protect themselves, too:

  1. Trust your gut. If an email seems suspicious, delete it.
  2. Regularly clean out your email inbox. Edgerton says a “longstanding backlog” of emails could give scammers access to sensitive information.
  3. If you have to send sensitive information via email, such as wire transfer number, make sure your email is encrypted.
  4. Change your usernames and passwords on a regular basis, and make sure your passwords aren’t “easy to guess.”
  5. Use the most up-to-date firewall and anti-virus technologies to protect your information.
  6. If you’ve been compromised, immediately change your username and password and notify anyone else who’s information could have been exposed.

Report the attack to the Federal Bureau of Investigations’ Internet Crime Complaint Center, and alert your local Realtor association.

Email Marian McPherson

 

 

 

National Flood Insurance Program expires in six months

WASHINGTON (March 30, 2017) — On Sept. 30, just six months from today, the National Flood Insurance Program will expire. The National Association of Realtors® is working closely with federal regulators and members of Congress to strengthen the program and clear the way for a private market to take hold; NAR has also issued a series of principles to improve access and affordability for consumers.

But Realtors® warn the program’s Sept. 30 reauthorization deadline is a threat to consumers.

NAR President William E. Brown, a second-generation Realtor® from Alamo, California and founder of Investment Properties, believes that expiration would deal significant damage to current policy-holding property owners, as well as threaten property sales and the broader housing market.

Brown said that Realtors® see the NFIP’s importance every day in their lives and in their business and made the following statement:

“When the NFIP expired in 2010, over 1,300 home sales were disrupted every day as a result. That’s over 40,000 every month. Flood insurance is required for a mortgage in the 100-year floodplain, but without access to the NFIP, buyers simply couldn’t get a mortgage or vital protection from the No. 1 cause of loss of property and life: flooding.

“This problem affects far more than coastal communities, and prospective homeowners aren’t the only ones at risk. Policyholders in over 22,000 communities across the country depend on the NFIP to protect homes and businesses from torrential rain, swollen rivers and lakes, snowmelt, failing infrastructure, as well as storm surges and hurricanes. When that lifeline is cut off, the NFIP can’t issue new policies or renew existing residential or commercial policies that expire. That means current home and business owners may find their most important asset unprotected.

“Last year was the third largest claims payout year in NFIP’s history, costing more than $4 billion. While there were five billion-dollar floods, including Hurricane Matthew, four of the five were inland, and the largest single event was in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in August, just one year out from the NFIP’s expiration date.

“The NFIP isn’t perfect, and reforms are needed. We will continue working closely with everyone involved to achieve those reforms.

“Good work has been done in Congress, at FEMA and elsewhere to clear the way for those efforts. We thank leaders on both sides of the aisle for all they’ve done up to this point. Now, it’s time for action. Congress has six months to do the right thing and pass a long-term reauthorization of the program. We’re hoping they do just that.”

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Carpet Capital Association of Realtors: When do you need a survey?

History indicates that surveys have been around for centuries, since the time of the Egyptians, who used them to accurately divide land for taxation purposes.

Since then, with the buying and selling of land, surveys have only become more important to buyers as a form of protection in any real estate transaction. In the past, surveys were much more common because lenders required them in all home purchases.

However, lenders stopped requiring surveys in the 1990s because they were trying to stay competitive in the market and keep down costs, plus they have special title insurance that will protect them from property disputes. Also many times, new homebuilders are not required to do a survey as long as they have a plat of the subdivision. This could leave homebuyers at a disadvantage because surveys reveal exactly the property the buyer is purchasing, the location of the improvements, ingress and egress easements, utility easements, property lines and much more.

A buyer may think that they are protected because they can see the pins or ribbons or the owner showed them the property line, but these are not always reliable sources of information because pins and ribbons can be moved, and therefore, these measurements are not always exact.

There have been instances where improvements such as fences, driveways, pools, out buildings and even the home itself have been placed over a property line. Also, it may be important to note that if a buyer has purchased title insurance, that policy will not protect them against encroachments unless the buyer has purchased a survey that would have revealed any encroachments prior to closing on the property.

In this case, even a previous owner’s survey would not be sufficient because it cannot be transferred to a third party. Another benefit from purchasing a survey is that it can show utility easements, easements or zoning classifications, which are important to know before purchasing land for commercial or residential use.

In conclusion, it is a good idea for a buyer to purchase a survey, however, if there is a recent survey and no new improvements have been made to the land, then the previous survey may be reliable. While surveys provide a lot of important information and protection for buyers, it is an extra cost that many buyers do not find necessary.

According to the National Association of Realtors report for 2016, there were 1,135 properties sold in our local area, and as close as it can be determined, fewer than 2 percent of buyers purchased a survey for these properties.

Given how incredibly expensive any resolution to correct an encroachment or other property dispute would cost a buyer, it seems $500-$750 for a residential lot survey is well worth the cost. Any buyer that ultimately decides to get a survey will find peace of mind in knowing there should be no surprises with their new home.

Gail Stanley is president of the Carpet Capital Association of Realtors and broker/owner of Peach Realty.

Majority of Realtors® Say Clients interested in Sustainability

WASHINGTON, April 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Growing consumer interest and demand for greener, more sustainable properties is driving a dialogue between Realtors® and homebuyers and sellers. Over half of Realtors® find that consumers have interest in real estate sustainability issues and practices, according to the National Association of Realtors®‘ recent REALTORS® and Sustainability report.

The report, stemming from NAR’s new Sustainability Program, surveyed Realtors® about sustainability issues facing consumers in the real estate market and ways Realtors® are setting their own goals to reduce energy usage.

2017 Sustainability

2017 Sustainability


“As consumers’ interest in sustainability grows, Realtors® understand the necessity of promoting sustainability in their real estate practice, such as marketing energy efficiency in property listings to homebuyers,” said NAR President William E. Brown, a Realtor® from Alamo, California and founder of Investment Properties. “The goal of the NAR Sustainability Program is to provide leadership and strategies on topics of sustainability to benefit members, consumers and communities.”

To meet growing consumer interest, more Multiple Listing Services are incorporating data entry fields to identify a property’s green features; 43 percent of respondents report their MLS has green data fields, and only 19 percent do not. Realtors® see great value in promoting energy efficiency in listings with seven out of 10 feeling strongly about the benefits in promoting those features to clients.  

The survey asked respondents about renewable energy and its impact on the real estate market. A majority of agents and brokers (80 percent) said that solar panels are available in their market; forty-two percent said solar panels increased the perceived property value.

Twenty-four percent of brokers said that tiny homes were available in their market, compared to 61 percent that reported tiny homes were not yet available. When asked about involvement with clients and green properties, 27 percent of agents and brokers were involved with 1 to 5 properties that had green features in the last 12 months. Seventy percent of members worked with no properties that had green features, leaving a great deal of room for future growth.

The home features that Realtors® said clients consider as very or somewhat important include a home’s efficient use of lighting (50 percent), a smart/connected home (40 percent), green community features such as bike lanes and green spaces (37 percent), landscaping for water conservation (32 percent), and renewable energy systems such as solar and geothermal (23 percent).                                    

When it comes to the sustainable neighborhood features for which clients are looking, 60 percent of Realtors® listed parks and outdoor recreation, 37 percent listed access to local food and nine percent listed recycling.

The transportation and commuting features of a community that Realtors® listed as very or somewhat important to their clients included walkability (51 percent), public transportation (31 percent) and bike lanes/paths (39 percent).

NAR initiated the Sustainability Program as a platform for dialogue on sustainability for Realtors®, brokers, allied trade associations, and consumers. The program’s efforts focus on coordination and articulation of NAR’s existing sustainability resources, while also supporting a growing area of interest for consumers, helping members to assist home buyers and sellers.

To further position NAR as a leader in real estate sustainability topics with consumers, Realtors®, brokers and allied trade associations, the REALTOR® Sustainability Program surveyed Realtors® pertaining to sustainability issues facing consumers and the industry. NAR plans to use this report to better benchmark Realtor® understanding of sustainability.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing over 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.                                                 

Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org. This and other news releases are posted in the “News, Blogs and Videos” tab on the website. 

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/majority-of-realtors-say-clients-interested-in-sustainability-300435598.html

SOURCE National Association of Realtors

Related Links

http://www.realtor.org