[Charts] NAR survey breaks down problems plaguing the appraisal …

Not only does the appraisal industry have problems, but there is also a lot of disagreement around what exactly those problems are.

One of the biggest problems, and yet still highly debated, is the industry’s lack of future workforce and the lack of effort to fix it. 

HousingWire’s most recent webinar brought together four experts in the appraisal industry to try and address what the future looks like for appraisers. But the webinar is a great example of the diverging opinions in the appraisal industry, with more than 100 questions coming in during the QA. 

This new survey of appraisers from the National Association of Realtors should help give more insight on the feelings of the industry.

NAR conducted the study to determine whether a shortage of appraisers exists and to what extent, as well as to further explore the other issues facing the appraisal profession, interviewing more than 2,000 appraisers.

In its summary, the association pinpointed the following three results, which will be highlighted further in charts below.

1. Training is a real issue.

Few seasoned appraisers are doing it, and those who do often do so for no pay. One challenge highlighted is the unwillingness of lenders to accept appraisals performed in part by a trainee, as well as concerns with liability. Fewer than 20% of appraisers train others.

2. Appraisers are working to address turnaround time:

But there’s less willingness to perform FHA/VA loans. Appraisers also complained of lower compensation from bank-owned asset management companies, or AMCs, as opposed to work done for law firms, lenders, and independent AMCs.

3. Dissatisfaction with the profession is high as challenges with FHA, others persist:

The average tenure of an appraisal hovered around 22 years, but roughly 10% of respondents said they may leave the field within 5 years. Frustrations with regulatory burdens and insufficient compensation are the top two reasons cited for a desire to leave. NAR has worked with FHA closely to address some of these concerns, and those conversations are ongoing.

National Association of Realtors President William Brown commented on the results saying: “The work of an appraiser is indispensable to our industry. Appraisers provide the credible, outside opinion on a property value that agents, lenders, and ultimately the consumer depend on to guide them through a transaction.”

“If the regulatory burdens holding appraisers back go unaddressed, the challenge of providing that timely appraisal will only get worse,” he added. “We have to work together as an industry to clear the way for appraisers to continue doing their good work while building an environment that encourages talented newcomers to get in the game.”

This first chart shows the average age of the industry is older since 22 years is the average time most of the appraisers interviewed have been in the industry.

Click to enlarge

(Source: NAR)

This next chart breaks down the reasons to leave the appraisal industry, with the two top answers being excessive regulation and insufficient compensation.

Click to enlarge

(Source: NAR)

In addition to this, few appraisers are training future appraisers, as the chart bellow depicts.

Click to enlarge

(Source: NAR)

This final chart explains why there is reluctance to accept trainees. Notice that the No. 1 reason is lack of compensation.

Click to enlarge

(Source: NAR)

‘No entry level housing options’: Report paints grim picture of Boulder County affordability

There’s no affordable homes left in Boulder County. Looking to head east to the Carbon Valley? There’s nothing left there, either.

That’s according to a new affordability study out of Longmont, a joint effort of Amy Aschenbrenner, CEO of the Longmont Association of Realtors, and Kyle Snyder of Land Title Guarantee Company.

In the last three years, the number of single family homes for sale under $250,000 has dropped 72 percent, and the number of attached dwellings for less than $150,000 declined by 87 percent.

“Those are gigantic numbers,” Snyder said. “If you have an inventory of something and then you take 87 percent of it away — that’s all of it.”

The report extends past Boulder County and into Weld and Larimer counties, covering Boulder, Longmont, Lafayette, Louisville, Superior, Erie, Loveland, Berthoud, Firestone, Frederick, Mead and Dacono.

Not one of the 12 towns has an average home price under $250,000, the study’s threshold for entry-level affordability. Dacono is the closest, with a $265,363 average cost.

For attached dwellings, only Mead was under the $150,000 threshold, with a $128,633 average — data that came from three sales last year.

“Our conclusion from the information presented here is that there are no entry level housing options,” reads the report. “The lines we drew in the sand as reasonably priced in both categories will soon be obsolete.”

Nationally, the median purchase price for first-time buyers was $170,000 in 2016, according to the National Association of Realtors. (The figure does not distinguish between attached and detached dwellings.)

Affordability has dipped nationwide, NAR found, in the nation as a whole and more than half the states, including Colorado. Across the U.S., median-income households could afford fewer than half the active listings in their respective areas.

In a recently released affordabilty report, NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun said, “Home prices have ascended far past wage growth in much of the country in recent years because not enough homeowners are selling and homebuilders have not boosted production enough to meet rising demand.”

Low inventory has been a huge challenge for Boulder County and much of the Front Range, particularly at lower price points.

Only 99 single-family homes sold for less than $250,000 in Boulder County last year, and just 22 attached units went for under $150,000.

Currently, there is one house and two attached dwellings for sale under those prices, all in Boulder.

“The $150,000-or-below condo or townhome is becoming extinct,” concludes the report.

It points out that the 1,000 homes under construction in Longmont might ease inventory concerns in that city, but not affordability.

“(The) starting price of these new homes is at or above the 2016 Longmont average home price of $386,043, so the availability of entry-level homes in the area will not change any time soon.”

There is only one possible fix, Snyder argues: reforming the state’s construction defect law that developers say is preventing them from building condominiums.

“The piece of the puzzle that’s missing is the condos; it’s clear,” he said. “It’s not a guessing game any longer.”

Local legislative workarounds have been pursued, and the Longmont City Council has discussed its own measure. A reform effort was killed just this week in the Colorado House, the Denver Business Journal reported.

Without the addition of lower-priced condos to the local market, Snyder predicts prices will go nowhere but up.

“The bidding wars, the short days on market — I don’t think it’s going to slow down,” he said. “The demand is just too high.”

Aside from the obviously devastating effect to potential buyers in lower income groups, the ever-rising prices could change the way real estate professionals and government entities think about affordability.

“Our measuring stick is about to become obsolete,” Snyder said.

Shay Castle: 303-473-1626, castles@dailycamera.com or twitter.com/shayshinecastle

Nevada REALTORS Visit France to Show Off Silver State Real Estate Opportunities

Leading REALTORS from throughout Nevada will be showing off real estate and investment opportunities in the Silver State by attending MIPIM.
Real estate leaders from around Nevada will again be attending the MIPIM real estate event in France in March.

LAS VEGAS – Leading REALTORS from throughout Nevada will be showing off real estate and investment opportunities in the Silver State by attending MIPIM, the world’s leading global real estate market, business conference and networking event, being held March 14-17 in Cannes, France.

Seven Nevada real estate industry leaders are attending the event this week, representing the statewide Nevada Association of REALTORS (NVAR), the Greater Las Vegas Association of REALTORS (GLVAR), the Reno-Sparks Association of REALTORS (RSAR) and the Commercial Alliance Las Vegas (CALV).

They include NVAR and GLVAR Past President Dave Tina, 2017 CALV President Jennifer Ott, CCIM, GLVAR Past President Scott Beaudry, GLVAR CEO Wendy DiVecchio and 2017 RSAR President John Graham, as well as Diane Brown, a Northern Nevada REALTOR who chairs NVAR’s Global Committee, and Tamara Larisa Tyrbouslu, a Las Vegas REALTOR who leads GLVAR’s Global Committee.

These Nevadans will be part of a growing USA pavilion, hosted by the National Association of REALTORS (NAR), the nation’s largest real estate trade organization.

This will be the second year Nevada REALTORS have attended MIPIM, Tina said. This year, he said Nevada’s representatives will apply “lessons learned” from their first year at the event, bringing additional information about “the most significant projects” being built or planned in the state. He said examples range from Tesla’s gigafactory being built near Reno and Sparks to the proposed professional football stadium being planned for a site near the south end of the Las Vegas Strip.

“We’ve prepared basic information on nearly 20 of the most significant real estate projects in Nevada, focusing on developments of $5 million or more,” Tina explained.

More than 23,000 leading real estate executives from 90 countries, including thousands of investors, are expected to attend the annual gathering of the global real estate industry. The event brings together investors, developers, occupiers, architects, hotel groups, public authorities, city mayors and property associations from around the world.

This is the third year of NAR’s expanded presence at this global event, providing local and regional U.S. markets the ability to showcase opportunities for foreign investment.

The U.S. consistently ranks among the top markets for international real estate investors, NAR officials say, in part because they view the U.S. as one of the safest places to purchase real estate.

NVAR leaders added that Las Vegas, Reno and other parts of Nevada have become increasingly popular places for foreign buyers to invest in homes and other forms of real estate.

In recent years, industry research has shown foreign buyers plan to invest increasing amounts of money in U.S. real estate. In fact, 64 percent of foreign investors surveyed by the industry association AFIRE last year planned to increase their investments in U.S. property.

In addition to Nevada and the greater Las Vegas area, U.S. markets featured in the USA pavilion include representatives from the states of Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Missouri and the metro areas of Miami and San Diego. The CCIM Institute and the Institute of Real Estate Management, both affiliated commercial industry groups of NAR, will also be featured in the USA pavilion.

About the NVAR

The Nevada Association of REALTORS® is a professional trade association with more than 15,000 members. NVAR is committed to protecting, promoting and preserving our communities. Visit www.NVAR.org.

About the GLVAR

GLVAR was founded in 1947 and provides its nearly 13,000 local members with education, training and political representation. The local representative of the National Association of REALTORS®, GLVAR is the largest professional organization in Southern Nevada. Each GLVAR member receives the highest level of professional training and must abide by a strict code of ethics. For more information, visit www.LasVegasRealtor.com.

About National Association of REALTORS®

The National Association of REALTORS®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association. NAR’s 1.1 million members, including NAR’s institutes, societies and councils, are involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

About MIPIM

MIPIM, the world’s leading property market, brings together all the key actors of the real estate business. Investors, developers, end-users, architects, hotel groups, public authorities and property associations gather in Cannes for four intensive days of networking, matchmaking and development of international business relations. MIPM has established itself as an essential meeting place for city administrations that attend in order to both promote inward investment opportunities and discuss major key policy issues that urban conglomerations are facing around the world. Learn more at www.mipim.com.

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NAR HOME Survey: Economic, Financial Optimism Surges; Renters Lukewarm About Buying

WASHINGTON, March 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Multiple years of uninterrupted job gains and hope that the best is yet to come in 2017 are igniting consumer confidence across the country, and especially in rural and middle America, according to new consumer survey findings from the National Association of Realtors®. The survey additionally found a growing disparity among renters who think it’s a good time to buy and homeowners who think it’s a good time to sell. 

In NAR’s ongoing quarterly Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey1, respondents were asked about their confidence in the U.S. economy and various questions about their housing expectations.

Lawrence Yun is chief economist and senior vice president of research at the National Association of Realtors(r). Yun oversees and is responsible for a wide range of research activity for the association including NAR's Existing Home Sales statistics, Affordability Index, and Home Buyers and Sellers Profile Report. He regularly provides commentary on real estate market trends for its 1 million Realtor(r) members. (PRNewsFoto/National Association of Realtors) (PRNewsFoto/National Association of Realtors)

Lawrence Yun is chief economist and senior vice president of research at the National Association of Realtors(r). Yun oversees and is responsible for a wide range of research activity for the association including NAR’s Existing Home Sales statistics, Affordability Index, and Home Buyers and Sellers Profile Report. He regularly provides commentary on real estate market trends for its 1 million Realtor(r) members. (PRNewsFoto/National Association of Realtors) (PRNewsFoto/National Association…


In the first three months of 2017, the share of households believing the economy is improving soared to its highest share in the survey’s five-quarter history (62 percent), and is up from 54 percent last quarter and 48 percent in March 2016.

In an extraordinary reversal from previous quarters, NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun says the surge in positive sentiment about the economy is primarily from respondents living in the Midwest (67 percent; 51 percent last quarter) and rural areas (63 percent; 43 percent last quarter). Last March, only 49 percent of Midwesterners and 35 percent of those living in rural areas thought the economy was improving.

“Confidence levels generally rise after a presidential election as the nation hopes for the best. Even though it is a highly polarized country, consumers for the most part have upbeat feelings about the economy right now,” he said. “Stronger business and consumer morale typically lead to even more hiring and spending, which in turn encourages more households to make big decisions like buying a home. These positive developments would be especially good news for prospective homebuyers in the more affordable Midwest region.”

Higher confidence in the economy is also translating to better feelings about households’ financial situation. The HOME survey’s monthly Personal Financial Outlook Index2 showing respondents’ confidence that their financial situation will be better in six months, jumped to its highest reading in the survey, climbing to 62.6 in March from 59.8 in December 2016. A year ago, the index was 58.1.

Affordability and inventory challenges dimming renter optimism
On the cusp of the busy spring season, most households believe now is a good time to buy a home. However, confidence continues to trickle backwards among renters. Fifty-six percent of renters said now is a good time to buy, which is down both from last quarter (57 percent) and a year ago (62 percent). Eighty percent of homeowners (78 percent in December 2016; 82 percent in March 2016) think now is a good time to make a home purchase. Younger households, renters and those living in the costlier West region – where prices continue to spike – are the least optimistic.

“Inventory conditions are even worse than a year ago3 and home prices and mortgage rates are on an uphill climb,” added Yun. “These factors are giving many renter households a pause about it being a good time to buy, even as their job prospects improve and wages grow. Unless there’s a significant boost in supply levels this spring, these constraints will unfortunately slow or delay some prospective buyers’ pursuit of purchasing a home.”

Led by the West, more homeowners view selling favorably right now
One promising trend that could alleviate supply shortages is the notable bump in the share of respondents this quarter who believe now is a good time to sell a home. Sixty-nine percent of homeowners think now is a good time to sell, which is up from last quarter (62 percent) and a year ago (56 percent). Continuing the trend over the past year, those in the West continue to be the most likely to think now is a good time to sell (77 percent), while also being the least likely to think it’s a good time to buy (61 percent).

NAR President William E. Brown, a Realtor® from Alamo, California, says homeowners looking to trade up or move down this spring could find themselves in a tricky spot without careful planning and a reliable expert on their side. “Demand far outpaces supply in many parts of the country right now, which means homeowners will likely sell their home much quicker than the time it takes to buy another,” he said. “Before listing, it’s best to have a carefully crafted plan in place. In addition to assisting in the hunt for a new home, a Realtor® is an invaluable negotiating partner in the common situation where a buyer’s new home purchase is contingent upon selling their property currently up for sale.”

About NAR’s HOME survey
In January through early March, a sample of U.S. households was surveyed via random-digit dial, including half via cell phones and the other half via land lines. The survey was conducted by an established survey research firm, TechnoMetrica Market Intelligence. Each month approximately 900 qualified households responded to the survey. The data was compiled for this report and a total of 2,698 household responses are represented.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

1NAR’s Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey tracks topical real estate trends, including current renters and homeowners’ views and aspirations regarding homeownership, whether or not it’s a good time to buy or sell a home, and expectations and experiences in the mortgage market. New questions are added to the survey each quarter to reflect timely topics impacting real estate.

HOME survey data is collected on a monthly basis and will be reported each quarter. New questions will be added to the survey each quarter to reflect timely topics impacting the real estate marketplace. The next release is scheduled for Monday, June 12, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. ET.

2Index ranges between 0 and 100: 0 = all respondents believe their personal financial situation will be worse in 6 months; 50 = all respondents believe their personal financial situation will be about the same in 6 months; 100 = all respondents believe their personal situation will be better in 6 months.

3Total housing inventory at the end of January was at 1.69 million existing homes available for sale, which is 7.1 percent lower than a year ago (1.82 million) and has fallen year-over-year for 20 straight months.

Information about NAR is available at www.nar.realtor. This and other news releases are posted in the “News, Blogs and Videos” tab on the website. Some statistical data in this release, as well as other tables and surveys, are posted in the “Research and Statistics” tab. Follow NAR Media’s Newsline blog at http://narnewsline.blogs.realtor.org and Twitter at @NARMedia.

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nar-home-survey-economic-financial-optimism-surges-renters-lukewarm-about-buying-300423655.html

SOURCE National Association of Realtors

Related Links

http://www.realtor.org

Schutz: Student debt, affordability affecting real estate market – Austin American

Being unable to afford buying a home was the main reason non-owners cited as to why they don’t own a home, and student debt continues to remain a large reason for that. Of the 39 percent of non-owners in the survey who said they have student debt, 59 percent indicated they are not very, or not at all, comfortable taking on a mortgage.

New California housing policies: tough to do and urgently needed


Marty Kovacs is the 2017 Chairman of the Santa Clarita Valley Division of the Southland Regional Association of Realtors. Courtesy photo.


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California’s housing crisis has an impact on all residents and undermines our state’s economy. But revising housing policies and encouraging construction of tens of thousands of new homes will require a long-term, consistent campaign.

“Revising housing policy is tough,” said Ben Metcalf, director of the state’s Department of Housing and Community Development.

He was keynote speaker at the recent “Housing Our Workers” forum presented by the Southland Regional Association of Realtors, the Valley Economic Alliance, the National Association of Realtors, and BizFed Institute.

“It’s up to you guys,” he told an audience of 200 that included representatives of all levels of government, labor groups, housing and homeless advocates, prospective homebuyers, as well as financial institutions and developers large and small.

“Lawmakers need to hear from you again and again,” he said. “Keep that drumbeat going so that people see the impact of the housing shortage.”


Ben Metcalf, director of California’s Department of Housing and Community Development. Courtesy photo.

Metcalf noted that the state recently released a draft of “California’s Housing Future: Challenges and Opportunities,” its first statewide housing assessment report since 2000. Lawmakers and state regulators are looking for input and suggestions on how to alleviate what Metcalf called an ”unsustainably low” level of home construction statewide.

During the 1970s and ’80s, California added 210,000 new homes each year. Today, that number has dropped to a mere 80,000 new homes despite demand for at least 150,000 additional homes annually.

Not only are there not enough homes; they’re not in the right places.

“The homes that are brought to market are disproportionately located farther away from jobs,” Metcalf said, which adds to worker stress, lost income, and a deteriorating quality of life.

“We’re seeing patterns emerging of inequality that are particularly unsettling,” Metcalf noted. “Young people are leaving the state … and the likelihood is rising that the younger generation will not do as well or better than their parents.”

Metcalf said there are a multitude of reasons why the housing shortage has appeared and there are many steps that can be taken to alleviate it.

Those steps include new legislation allowing the conversion of garages into income-generating housing units, sweeping new rules to reduce fees on new construction, seeking ways to help local jurisdictions foster development, and creating ongoing funding sources for building new units to help get more people into homes of their own.

“We need to be realistic about where things stand,” he said, “but we also need to step forward and make change happen.”

Marty Kovacs is the 2017 Chairman of the Santa Clarita Valley Division of the 9,600-member Southland Regional Association of Realtors. David Walker, of Walker Associates, co-authors articles for SRAR. The column represents SRAR’s views and not necessarily those of The Signal. The column contains general information about the real estate market and is not intended to replace advice from your Realtor or other realty related professionals.

 

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Realtors: Economic, Financial Optimism Surges

Consumer confidence across the country, and especially in rural and middle America, is rising, according to new consumer survey findings from the National Association of Realtors. The survey additionally found a growing disparity among renters who think it’s a good time to buy and homeowners who think it’s a good time to sell.

According to the Realtor’s ongoing quarterly Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey, in the first three months of 2017, the share of households believing the economy is improving soared to its highest share in the survey’s five-quarter history (62%), up from 54% last quarter and 48% in March 2016.


NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun said the surge in positive sentiment about the economy is primarily from respondents living in the Midwest (67%; 51% last quarter) and rural areas (63%; 43% last quarter). Last March, only 49% of Midwesterners and 35% of those living in rural areas thought the economy was improving.

“Confidence levels generally rise after a presidential election as the nation hopes for the best. Even though it is a highly polarized country, consumers for the most part have upbeat feelings about the economy right now,” he said. “Stronger business and consumer morale typically lead to even more hiring and spending, which in turn encourages more households to make big decisions like buying a home. These positive developments would be especially good news for prospective homebuyers in the more affordable Midwest region.”

Higher confidence in the economy is also translating to better feelings about households’ financial situation. The HOME survey’s monthly Personal Financial Outlook Index showing respondents’ confidence that their financial situation will be better in six months, jumped to its highest reading in the survey, climbing to 62.6 in March from 59.8 in December 2016. A year ago, the index was 58.1.

On the cusp of the busy spring season, most households believe now is a good time to buy a home. However, confidence continues to trickle backwards among renters. 56% of renters said now is a good time to buy, which is down both from last quarter (57%) and a year ago (62%). Eighty% of homeowners (78% in December 2016; 82% in March 2016) think now is a good time to make a home purchase. Younger households, renters and those living in the costlier West region – where prices continue to spike – are the least optimistic.

“Inventory conditions are even worse than a year ago and home prices and mortgage rates are on an uphill climb,” added Yun. “These factors are giving many renter households a pause about it being a good time to buy, even as their job prospects improve and wages grow. Unless there’s a significant boost in supply levels this spring, these constraints will unfortunately slow or delay some prospective buyers’ pursuit of purchasing a home.”

One trend that could alleviate supply shortages is the notable bump in the share of respondents this quarter who believe now is a good time to sell a home. 69% of homeowners think now is a good time to sell, which is up from last quarter (62%) and a year ago (56%). Continuing the trend over the past year, those in the West continue to be the most likely to think now is a good time to sell (77%), while also being the least likely to think it’s a good time to buy (61%).

The survey was conducted by TechnoMetrica Market Intelligence. Each month approximately 900 qualified households responded to the survey. The data was compiled for this report and a total of 2,698 household responses are represented.

Risk Management in the Digital Age – RISMedia

As brokers, you’re well aware of the need for risk management strategies to protect your business, agents and clients from legal liability. No doubt you have errors and omissions insurance, and have taken steps to guarantee compliance with antitrust laws; yet, in this era, with more and more business conducted electronically, do you think you’ve done enough to mitigate potential digital threats? Due to the amount of personal information and large sums of money exchanged in the course of real estate transactions, the real estate industry is a particularly attractive target for cyberattacks.

Without proper data security protocols in place, your business is vulnerable to a variety of potential risks. Your clients are at risk for identity theft should their personal information fall into the wrong hands, and your and your clients’ money is at risk if a criminal gains access to information that allows them to perpetrate wire fraud or impersonation scams. Increasingly, your data and finances are at risk from potential ransomware attacks in which hackers gain control of your machine until a sum of money is paid. You also run the risk of legal liability if a data breach of any kind occurs at your brokerage.

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to safeguard your data against these risks. First, consider the essential need to protect your clients’ privacy. Understand your state’s requirements before creating a privacy plan, as state laws govern not only what constitutes Personally Identifiable Information (PII), but also specify how the information is collected, used, stored and destroyed. While the details of privacy laws may vary, it’s always good practice to communicate your office’s privacy plans with clients. They entrust you with their sensitive data and deserve to know what you’re doing to protect their information. Should a data breach occur, it’s critical to have a plan in place for notifying your clients immediately. Transparency in all aspects of caring for client data not only reduces potential liability, but also contributes to the sense of trust between agent and client.

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The National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) recommends following the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) key principles for data security: take stock, scale down, lock it, pitch it, and plan ahead. Essentially, these principles provide a framework for managing your data in accordance with best practices.

In addition to these five principles, there are some basic security practices that any business owner should keep in mind. Require strong password security throughout your business systems, employ firewalls and antivirus software, and always use platforms with strong encryption capabilities to transmit sensitive information. Finally, your best defense against the risk of cyberattacks is education. Be sure your agents are aware of the dangers of poorly secured data and understand your company’s privacy and data security policies.

For further reading on the subject, NAR has put together a collection of educational tools and resources, including the NAR Data Security and Privacy Toolkit, all available at NAR.realtor. In addition, the FTC’s website, FTC.gov, has a wealth of articles and guidelines aimed at helping business owners understand how to protect their data. Educate yourself and your agents, develop privacy policies and commit to strong data security strategies, and you’ll be well prepared against digital risks.

Marc Gould is vice president, Business Specialties, for NAR and executive director of REBAC. A wholly-owned subsidiary of NAR, The Real Estate Buyer’s Agent Council (REBAC) is the world’s largest association of real estate professionals focusing specifically on representing the real estate buyer. With more than 30,000 active members, REBAC awards the Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®) designation to REALTORS® who work directly with buyer-clients.

For more information, please visit REBAC.net.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

Santa Clara County Association of REALTORS® and VNARP …

Delegates from the groups will attend real estate conferences and meet with Vietnamese companies and government agencies in Ho Chi Minh City, Ha Noi, and Danang ─ three cities currently experiencing a boom in real estate development. Several delegates from the United States will be giving special presentations at these events, including: Lieu Nguyen, the President’s Liaison to Vietnam for the National Association of REALTORS®, Ron Gonzales, former Mayor City of San Jose and President of Presencia, LLC, and Hilda Ramirez, the Director of Public Relations, Events, and Education for SCCAOR.

Hilda Ramirez, who led SCCAOR Members on a similar trip to China in 2015, said that REALTORS® are starting to embrace the global market when it comes to real estate investment. “The theme for this Inaugural Trade Mission is to ‘Connect Cultures to Create Commerce’,” she said. “Silicon Valley is home base for technology and innovation, considered one of the most thriving economies in the world, and the economic impact happening in many Vietnamese cities is truly dynamic. We are honored to have the opportunity to join VNARP in this unique opportunity. It is essential for today’s business professional to be well versed on emerging markets.”

Silicon Valley, Ho Chi Minh City, and Ha Noi all rank in the top 10 of the World’s “Most Dynamic Cities of 2017” according to the JLL City Momentum Index. This index was calculated by examining over 40 variables such as innovation capacity, technological prowess, commercial real estate momentum, and a host of other socio-economic factors.

For updates on the trip, visit the Santa Clara County Association of REALTORS® on Facebook at www.facebook.com/sccrealtors

Contact: Spencer High 
Phone: 408.445.5095 
spencer@sccaor.com

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/santa-clara-county-association-of-realtors-and-vnarp-embark-on-real-estate-trade-mission-to-vietnam-300415126.html

SOURCE Santa Clara County Association of REALTORS

Related Links

http://www.sccaor.com

Miami Realtors to Showcase South Florida at Global Expo


Miami Realtors to Showcase South Florida at Global Expo The MIAMI Association of REALTORS® (MIAMI) will promote South Florida real estate at the world’s largest property show, MIPIM, on March 14-17, in Cannes, France as part of the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) expanded U.S. pavilion. MIAMI has exhibited with NAR at MIPIM for three consecutive years to increase awareness of our South Florida and U.S. markets.

MIAMI leaders will tout Miami’s rise as a world-class global city and work to attract more commercial and residential investment for South Florida and the advantages of doing business with MIAMI members.

“We are honored to once again promote Miami and South Florida at the world’s No. 1 business event,” said Christopher Zoller, a Coral Gables Realtor and 2017 MIAMI Chairman of the Board. “Real estate is an integral part of South Florida’s economy and it’s important to showcase Miami’s evolution as a top world-class city on this global stage. Investors want to build and develop properties in Miami because we’re growing, boast an incredible lifestyle and abound with economic opportunities. MIAMI also features the markets of Broward, Jupiter and Martin County.”

NAR hosts a U.S. pavilion to increase awareness of U.S. markets with commercial and luxury development potential. In addition to Miami, U.S. markets featured at the MIPIM U.S. pavilion include the states of Florida and the metro areas of San Diego and New York.

Five MIAMI leaders and three MIAMI executives will represent MIAMI at the MIPIM exhibit. Participating MIAMI leaders are: Chairman Zoller of EWM Realty International; 2017 Chairman of the Board-Elect George C. Jalil of First Service Realty, Real Living; 2017 Commercial President José María “Chepe” Serrano of New Miami Realty Corp.; 2017 Commercial President-Elect Brian Sharpe of Sharpe Properties Group; and 2017 Residential President Christina Pappas of The Keyes Company.

MIAMI Chief Executive Officer Teresa King Kinney, MIAMI Senior Vice President of Public Relations International Lynda Fernandez and MIAMI Vice President of Government Affairs and City of Doral Councilwoman Ana Maria Rodriguez will also participate.

MIAMI to Highlight Robust South Florida Real Estate Market

South Florida is one of the world’s top destinations for international investment. Foreign buyers purchased $6.2 billion of South Florida residential properties in 2016, up from $6.1 billion a year ago, according to the 2016 Profile of International Home Buyers of MIAMI Association of REALTORS® (MIAMI) conducted by MIAMI and NAR.

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