EBCBOR Attends NAR Communications Directors Institute

The Eastern Bergen County Board of REALTORS® (EBCBOR) recently attended the National Association of REALTORS®’ (NAR) Communications Directors Institute in Chicago, Ill., the company recently announced. The two-day conference gathers communications staff from across the country to learn and network.

“I am so fortunate to be able to be a part of such an educational conference,” says Jennifer Mejia, communications coordinator for EBCBOR. “I think it’s great to see the importance and emphasis NAR puts on ensuring that REALTORS® are getting the all the tools required to succeed through special education and preparation for the staff working on the back-end at each association. Additionally, it was especially rewarding to see the camaraderie among the diverse group of attendees; it was a breath of fresh air to see firsthand that everyone in the conference shares the same goal and passion, and that was, as NAR’s CEO Dale Stinton mentioned in his speech, to ensure that we as communicators are reaching both spectrums, REALTORS® and consumers alike, in an effective manner.”

“As communicators, we never forget who we work for,” said Stinton via video at the conference. “Our goal is to ensure that REALTORS® stay at the center of the transaction. Homeownership and real estate investments are the essentials of the American story.”

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This School District Asked Real Estate Agents to Help Rekindle Its …

Brian McDonald was looking for a new home several years ago in the wealthy city of Pasadena. He says when he told the real estate agent that he had five school-age children, she told him not to enroll in Pasadena’s public schools.

That was pretty surprising to McDonald. He’s the school district’s superintendent.

“Her recommendation was Arcadia, or even Glendora,” two nearby cities, he says. “She thought that it was OK to tell me that I should put my kids in another district. I mean, I couldn’t believe it. My jaw dropped.”

A contentious desegregation order decades ago has helped turn Pasadena into a city with big divisions in education. Nearly half of the area’s kids attend private school or a school outside the district — more than any district its size in the country.

The National Association of Realtors advises agents not to tell clients whether schools are good or bad. That may steer them away or toward a particular community — which could be a violation of federal fair housing laws. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen.

And in McDonald’s view, the agent’s recommendation is part of an outdated view that the city’s public schools are poor quality — a point of view that persists today.

Just ask Lauren Lofton. When considering a move to Pasadena, she looked into the public schools for her 4-year-old daughter. Despite home price tags near or above $1 million, Lofton found low standardized test scores.

“It doesn’t make sense,” she says. “You can have these great homes, great values, great for raising families, but everyone is saying you have to go to private school.”

She says many of those recommendations came from friends and family.

“I think if your house is worth a lot of money in good neighborhoods, you should be able to go to the neighborhood school.”

Loften’s agent, Del Lile, grew up here, but moved away when he had kids, in part because of poor school reputations. That was years ago.

Lile says relying on hearsay, or doing a quick internet search, doesn’t tell you the whole picture about a school district.

“So often, people just look at a score from GreatSchools or whatever,” says Lile. “And that really doesn’t tell the story.” He says those numbers can be skewed for a variety of reasons.

When working with Loften, he made sure to include information about Pasadena’s bilingual programs, new magnet programs and its growing college admissions at one of the high schools.

Lile says his opinion on the district turned around after he joined something called the Realtor Initiative, a program created a couple of years ago by the school district’s independent fundraising foundation.

The goal of the program is to give real estate agents up-to-date information about new programs and results in the district — and to ask them what schools can do to attract families like the Loftons.

After all, Pasadena graduation rates have been improving faster than the state average and enrollment isn’t dropping as fast as it was four years ago.

School officials met with hundreds of agents at their offices, asked them to volunteer in the schools and pulled the curtain back on decision-making in the school district. There’s even a monthly Lunch with the Superintendent.

Unlike the city as a whole, Pasadena’s public school population is predominately black, Latino and low income. Superintendent McDonald says the program “is a part of our desire to attract a more diverse group of kids into our school system.”

By diverse, he means the type of families who have turned away from Pasadena schools for decades: professionals, white, Asian families. Those student populations have been growing in recent years.

McDonald says there’s another sign that the initiative is working: He’s looking for a new home — and this time, the real estate agent recommended Pasadena public schools.

Copyright 2017 Southern California Public Radio. To see more, visit Southern California Public Radio.

Hurdles to homeownership and why we are not unique

The National Association of Realtors (NAR) recently held the Sustainable Homeownership Conference at the University of California, Berkeley, where a group of experts discussed potential ways to reverse the decline in homeownership. This is a topic of recent interest in Reno-Sparks, and much is being done to work on the issue of housing affordability. During the meeting, the five main reasons why would-be buyers are locked out of the housing market were discussed. The reasons are below, and I’ll provide my insight into them from a local perspective.

Post-foreclosure stress disorder

The Great Recession caused long-lasting psychological changes in the financial decision-making for the estimated 9 million homeowners who lost their homes to foreclosure, and the millions who lost their jobs. While I am not a psychologist, I can tell you that the effects were far-reaching, and not to be under estimated. For those who lost their jobs and then subsequently their homes, they now may have recovered financially on paper from the loss and be ready to acquire a home. However, emotional loss has not been forgotten. They are approaching homeownership cautiously, yet not wanting to subject themselves to the trauma experienced from 2005 to 2011. The recession also impacted the children of those families who are now future homeowners. The good news is that according to the National Association of Realtors Profile of Homebuyers and Sellers 2016, 82 percent of reported buyers continue to see purchasing a home as a good financial investment.

Mortgage availability

Credit standards have not normalized since the recession, and borrowers with good-to-excellent credit scores are not getting approved at the rate they were in 2003. There’s a saying in the market: “Money is readily available to borrow to those who don’t need it.” Lending has decreased as banks have withheld loan approvals from many households, even those with excellent credit scores. Credit standards have loosened slightly since the end of the Great Recession, and mortgage lending has slowly improved. According to Rosen Consulting Group, who prepared a study for the National Association of Realtors in June 2017, the total purchase lending declined by 22.7 percent between 2003 and 2016, falling by approximately $290 billion to slightly less than $1 trillion in home purchase mortgage originations.

Growing burden of student loan debt

Repaying student loan debt is making it difficult for young households to save for a down payment and qualify for a mortgage. According to the National Association of Realtors Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers 2016, 26 percent of the first-time homebuyers responding said saving for a down payment was the most difficult step in the process. Of that share, 55 percent said student loan debt delayed them in saving for a home.

Locally debt, along with rising rents, compound the difficulty experienced by potential first-time homebuyers to realistically save the dollars necessary to accumulate funds for a down payment.

Single-family housing affordability

Lack of inventory, high home prices and high rents are causing decaying affordability conditions in many markets. Although it may feel as though Reno, Sparks and Washoe County aren’t the only areas impacted by this, increasing home prices and rents along with low inventory are a national issue. The chart with this story displays how Reno home price increases compare to other Metropolitan Statistical Areas.

Single-family housing supply shortages

Nationally, as of April 2017, the inventory of existing for-sale single family homes increased during the past five months to 1.7 million, yet inventory is down by 8.6 percent from a year earlier, according to NAR. Moreover, the supply of homes for sale in April 2017 was down by 1.6 million compared with the pre-recession peak in 2007. Months of supply, which measures the number of months it would take for the current inventory of homes on the market to sell given the current pace of sales, fell steadily during the last three years to a 12-year low of 4.3 months in 2016, from 5.2 months in 2014.

The current months of supply was dramatically lower than the post-recession peak of 10 months in 2008, and since 1983 is the lowest level of months of supply, besides 2004, when this measure was also at 4.3 months. If the inventory of existing single family homes does not improve, home prices will continue to increase, reaching record-highs or near-peak levels in many markets, depressing homeownership growth. This along with an inadequate level of homebuilding has led to a cumulative deficit of nearly 3.7 million new homes over the last eight years.

In Washoe County (excluding Incline Village), units sold compared to new listings historically follows a seasonal pattern of highs and lows in units sold and new listing inventory. Prior to 2017, new listings were between 28 percent and 41 percent ahead of units sold for the months January-June. For the first six months of 2017, the average is 21 percent.

In conclusion, we are not unique. This problem exists to a greater or lesser degree across the country. There is no “silver bullet” that can quickly mitigate any of the hurdles to home ownership that we are experiencing today. There have not been enough new housing units built to meet demand for several years. Builders are beginning to build once again; however, at the current rate of construction along with prices mostly above the area median price, it will be several years before our inventory comes into balance.

By John Graham is the 2017 RSAR President and a Realtor with RE/MAX Premier Properties.

Parade float winners announced

CANTON  The National Association of Realtors and the Stark County Association of Realtors have taken the top award for float entries in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival Canton Repository Grand Parade. The organization took the grand prize for best overall entry in the parade for “Homeownership: We Were Made for This.”

All 15 float entries will be seen in the parade in downtown Canton Saturday.

Chairman Pete Truemper announced the 2017 float award winners, which were selected by judges Megan Kalman of Pepsico, Mike Walpole of Brewster Cheese and Jim Chapman of Selinsky Force.

The awards and winners are:

Grand prize (best overall entry in the parade): “Homeownership: We Were Made for This,” sponsored by the National Association of Realtors and the Stark County Association of Realtors.
Builders’ Award (best professional builder entry): “The 12th Man Float,” sponsored by Akron Auto Auction.
Ohio State Award (best non-professional builder entry): “Local 540 Union,” sponsored by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.
Enshrinees’ Award (most-effective use of color harmony): “Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival Queen Court,” sponsored by Ziegler Bolt Nut House.
Mayor’s Award (best display of animation): “Celebrating 100 Years,” sponsored by Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church.
HOF Board of Trustees’ Award (most-original concept): “Crane Float,” sponsored by Midwest Crane Rentals.
NFL Award (best use of flowers or natural covering): “Freedom Float,” sponsored by Newcomer’s Chapel of Pigeon Run United Methodist Church.
Janice C. Meyer Award (best display of enthusiasm): “Tailgating Begins at Sam’s Club,” sponsored by Sam’s Club.
Exceptional Merit Award: “Louisville Constitution Town Queen and Court,” sponsored by Louisville Chamber of Commerce.
Exceptional Merit Award: “Cash Explosion 30th Anniversary,” sponsored by the Ohio Lottery Commission.
Exceptional Merit Award: “Jackson Polar Bears Basketball and Baseball State Champions,” sponsored by Akron Auto Auction, Jackson Youth Basketball Association, and Jerzee’s Sports Bar Grille.

The Grand Parade has been a tradition since 1963 when 40,000 spectators attended the first parade. Since then, it has grown to a crowd of 200,000 lining the 2.2-mile parade route each year and millions more viewing it via television broadcast.

The parade typically features about 110 entries, including floats, marching bands, helium balloons, costume characters, unique specialty units and the current class of Enshrinees and their presenters.

For more news and a complete schedule of the remaining Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival events, visit www.profootballhofef.com.

This School District Asked Real-Estate Agents To Help Rekindle Its …

Housing, school scores and Real Estate

Housing, school scores and Real Estate

Brian MacDonald was looking for a new home several years ago in the wealthy city of Pasadena, Calif. He says when he told the real-estate agent that he had five school-aged children, she told him not to enroll in Pasadena’s public schools.

That was pretty surprising to MacDonald. He’s the school district’s superintendent.

“Her recommendation was Arcadia, or even Glendora,” two nearby cities, he says. “She thought that it was OK to tell me that I should put my kids in another district. I mean, I couldn’t believe it. My jaw dropped.”

A contentious desegregation order decades ago has helped turn Pasadena into a city with big divisions in education. Nearly half of the area’s kids attend private school or a school outside the district – more than any district its size in the country.

The National Association of Realtors advises agents not to tell clients whether schools are good or bad. That may steer them away or toward a particular community — which could be a violation of federal Fair Housing laws. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen.

And in MacDonald’s view, the agent’s recommendation is part of an outdated view that the city’s public schools are poor quality — a point of view that persists today.

Just ask Lauren Lofton. When considering a move to Pasadena, she looked into the public schools for her 4-year-old daughter. Despite home price tags near or above a million dollars, Lofton found low standardized test scores.

“It doesn’t make sense,” she says. “You can have these great homes, great values, great for raising families, but everyone is saying you have to go to private school.”

She says many of those recommendations came from friends and family.

“I think if your house is worth a lot of money in good neighborhoods, you should be able to go to the neighborhood school.”

Loften’s agent, Del Lile, grew up here, but moved away when he had kids, in part because of poor school reputations. That was years ago.

Lile says relying on hearsay, or doing a quick internet search, doesn’t tell you the whole picture about a school district.

“So often people just look at a score from GreatSchools or whatever,” says Lile. “And that really doesn’t tell the story.” He says those numbers can be skewed for a variety of reasons.

When working with Loften, he made sure to include information about Pasadena’s bilingual programs, new magnet programs and its growing college admissions at one of the high schools.

Lile says his opinion on the district turned around after he joined something called the Realtors’ Initiative, a program created a couple years ago by the school district’s independent fundraising foundation.

The goal of the program is to give real-estate agents up-to-date information about new programs and results in the district — and to ask them what schools can do to attract families like the Loftons.

After all, Pasadena graduation rates have been improving faster than the state average and enrollment isn’t dropping as fast as it was four years ago.

School officials met with hundreds of agents at their offices, asked them to volunteer in the schools and pulled the curtain back on decision-making in the school district. There’s even a monthly Lunch with the Superintendent.

Unlike the city as a whole, Pasadena’s public school population is predominately black, Latino and low-income. Superintendent Brian MacDonald says the program, “is a part of our desire to attract a more diverse group of kids into our school system.”

By diverse, he means the type of families who’ve turned away from Pasadena schools for decades: professionals, white, Asian families. Those student populations have been growing in recent years.

MacDonald says there’s another sign that the initiative is working: He’s looking for a new home — and this time, the realtor recommended Pasadena public schools.

Business Notes for Aug. 6

The approval process is initiated by the Realtor’s local association of Realtors. The applications are approved or disapproved individually state by state at the national level. The approved applications are then sent to the National Executive Committee where they are scrutinized again and approved or disapproved. The final step for status approval is the presentation of each applicant to the entire sitting body of the National Association of Realtors Board of Directors which consists of 684 members. When the applicants are approved by a vote of the Board of Directors, the lifetime status of Realtor Emeritus is awarded to the applicant.

The real estate agent must have held 40 years of continuous, honorable membership in the National Association of Realtors and completed at least one year of service to their local Association.

Pecarich is one of only 24 Realtors out of the 18,900 State of Minnesota Realtor members and one of 1,064 out of 1,240,000 Nationwide Realtor members to receive this prestigious award. Pecarich is the second to receive this award while licensed with Kurilla Real Estate.

Urologists join Tri-County Health Care specialty services

WADENA—Tri-County Health Care added a new team of visiting board-certified

urologists to its Wadena Clinic specialty services thanks to a partnership with Essentia Health. The team of Scott Wheeler, M.D.; Bradley Qualey, M.D.; and Eric Chapman, D.O., starts on Wednesday. Wheeler, Qualey and Chapman provide medical and surgical treatment for a wide range of urological conditions, including male infertility, urinary incontinence, kidney stones, overactive bladder, hematuria, recurrent urinary tract infections and urological cancers.

The urologists are also devoted to treating children from infancy through adolescence, offering a large spectrum of pediatric services such as unstable bladder, nighttime incontinence, bed wetting and recurrent urinary tract infections.

CenterPoint Energy recognized

CenterPoint Energy has been honored with the 2017 Southern Gas Association Community Service award, recognizing the company’s natural gas safety education website, Safe and Smart with Buddy Blue Flame.

The Community Service Award is given annually to recognize the SGA member company with the most effective service or outreach program that improves the community. The award was presented at the organization’s recent Management Conference in Baltimore, MD. Some of the requirements include: problem solving through a specific action, decision, program or initiative with definite, substantive results during the eligible calendar year.

CRMC gains recognition

Cuyuna Regional Medical Center was recently named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Patient Experience by the Women’s Choice Award, America’s trusted referral source for the best in health care. The award signifies that CRMC has been ranked within the top 100 hospitals of similar size based on number of beds.

The methodology used to select CRMC as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Patient Experience is unique in that it evaluates specific Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey results along with primary research about women’s health care preferences.

The Women’s Choice Award collects the data for the following HCAHPS survey measures and uses a weighted average to award the best hospitals for patient experience: effective communication with nurses and doctors, responsiveness to requests for help, pain management, explanation about medications before being administered, bathroom and room cleanliness and patient recommendation rating.

CRMC is one of 400 award recipients representing the hospitals that have met the highest standards for patient experience in the U.S. by the Women’s Choice Award.

Essentia Health honors 12 nurses

Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center Clinics celebrated National Nurses Day with a ceremony recognizing nurses who model Essentia Health values in their daily work.

As the largest employer in Crow Wing County, one in three of our nearly 1,500 colleagues are nurses. At Essentia nurses have many different areas of expertise and training and fill important roles in almost every part of our organization. Some examples include registered nurses (RN), licensed practical nurses (LPN), nurse practitioners (NP), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA), and clinical nurse specialists.

Essentia honored 12 nurses who embody six values — Quality, Hospitality, Respect, Justice, Stewardship, and Teamwork.

Wendy Davidson, RN, BSN from Baxter and Louise Severson, LPN from Brainerd received the Quality award for finding ways to improve care and consistently seek learning to provide the highest level of care.

Jessica Noonkesser, RN ADN from Brainerd and Kim Hemmerich, RN BA from Nisswa received the Hospitality award for consistently making patients, visitors and coworkers feel welcome at Essentia Health.

Rachel Vopatek, RN, BA from Brainerd and Julie Goshey, RN from Ironton received the Respect award for treating patients, coworkers, and families as their equal, and respects their input into the care of the patient.

Tanya Hanson, LPN from Brainerd and Heather Mutch, LPN from Baxter received the Justice award for ensuring patient and family needs are addressed and that patients and visitors are treated equally at Essentia.

Julie Smith, RN, BA from Nisswa and Marjet Lowe, RN from Brainerd received the Stewardship award for not only maintaining cost effectiveness in their department, but promoting well being of Essentia patients to ensure the highest quality care within financial and resource limits.

Shannon Paysse, RN, BA from Baxter and Deb Ferrell, RN from Brainerd received the Teamwork award for being an active participant in daily activities and openly promote teamwork and interdisciplinary communication among others.

Gunnufson joins Edina Realty Baxter Sales Office

Edina Realty, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, recently announced that Valerie Gunnufson has joined its Baxter sales office.

Gunnufson comes to Edina Realty with 19 years of experience selling homes and 5 of

those years with Coldwell Banker East-West Realty. Prior to that, she worked in office

administration and Collections. She specializes in Residential and lakeshore homes,

new construction and guiding first-time homebuyers.

Gunnufson recently moved to Pillager from the Cloquet area with her husband.

Business After Hours at AutoSmith Service Group

Join AutoSmith Service Group as it hosts Business After Hours from 5-7 p.m. Aug. 8 at 803 Fourth St. in the Ironton Industrial Park.

Business After Hours is a Cuyuna Lakes Chamber function for members of the business community and is also open to the public, so bring your business cards and get ready to network and build relationships while you enjoy some great concession-style food, beverages, raffle prizes, and take a look around the shop.

As a courtesy to the host, advanced registration is recommended. To make your reservation, email jessica@cuyunalakes.com or register online by clicking on the link below.

Safari North Wildlife Park hosts Business After Hours

Join Safari North Wildlife Park as they host at Business After Hours on Tuesday, August 8, 2017 from 4:30-6 p.m. at its location along Highway 371 south of Brainerd.

Brainerd Lakes Chamber of Commerce members are invited to register and attend this free event, so bring your business cards and get ready to network with other business representatives in the area. Attendees are also encouraged to bring door prizes.

As a courtesy to the host, advanced registration is recommended. Call 218-829-2838 for more information. Registration at the event will take place outside the main building, with the prize drawing and a presentation at the Pavilion.

Essentia Health supports employees in their pursuit of knowledge

Employee Education Fund provides up to $80,000 in tuition reimbursement

Nine Essentia Health colleagues recently received approval for tuition reimbursement through the Essentia Health Employee Education Fund totaling up to $80,000 in support of their pursuit of knowledge.

Criteria used to evaluate recipients include their professional goals, recommendation letters and how they live out the mission and values of Essentia each day in their work.

Recipients of the most recent tuition reimbursements include:

• John “Russ” Anderson of Brainerd for Bachelor’s in Science-Nursing

• Alex Chamtcheu Tchamtcheu of Brainerd for Master of Arts-Healthcare Mission Leadership

• Brenna Chisholm of Brainerd for Bachelor’s in Science-Nursing

• Chelsey Hanen of Brainerd for Master’s in Nursing-Family Medicine Nurse Practitioner

• Kenzie Hohman of Brainerd for Master’s of Business Administration

• Melissa Knopik Brainerd for Master’s in Nursing-Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

• Carissa Nelson of Brainerd for Bachelor’s in Science-Nursing

• Sarah Steffen of Baxter for Master’s of Business Administration

• Ruth Wilhelm of Baxter for Bachelor’s in Science-Nursing

CRMC graduates EMT class

Seven area residents recently graduated from Cuyuna Regional Medical Center’s Spring 2017 EMT class. They successfully completed all seven skills competency stations July 31 and may now sit for their National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians computer exam to achieve national certification. Graduates are Preston Lee of McGregor, Patrick Sellers of McGregor, Nathan Puttbrese of Baxter, Alexandria Amling of Pillager, Angella Abernathy of Brainerd, Hannah Wekseth of Brainerd and Vanessa Barnum of Crosby. Their instructor was Bryan Krantz.

CRMC’s EMT students have achieved a 91 percent first attempt pass rate since 2013 with the national average being 68 percent. Registration is now open for a Fall 2017 EMT class starting Sept. 11.

Realtors complete advanced courses

James Hanley and Douglas Meagher of RE/MAX Team, Realtors, Johnstown, have completed three advanced courses toward their Pennsylvania Broker License requirements. 

Hanley and Meagher represent buyers and sellers and are members of the Cambria-Somerset Association of Realtors, Pennsylvania Association of Realtors and National Association of Realtors.

Realtors beware: There’s another phishing scam out to get you …

Realtors once again find themselves susceptible to another scam that threatens to con them into paying fines.

The National Association of Realtors warned its members of a new phishing scam that is targeting real estate professionals.  

According to the association, “A broker recently received a text message claiming to be from the National Association of Realtors and accusing her of sending ‘racist texts and emails.’ The text message demanded she pay a $1,345 fine.”

Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time a scam has happened like this toward real estate agents. Earlier this year, realtors in the state of Florida were targeted and threatened with the suspension of their license as part of an elaborate scam allegedly perpetrated by a fake Realtor group.

Plus, a little over a year ago, the Federal Trade Commission and NAR issued a warning to people interested in buying a home after scammers started to pose as real estate agents, Realtors and title insurance companies to steal consumers’ closing costs.

NAR noted that for anyone who receives a similar scam text, the Federal Bureau of Investigations recommended the following steps:

  • Report the incident to the FBI IC3 web site.
  • If you suspect that any phone numbers or contact information were obtained due to a breach of a computer system, alert your IT department or consult an IT specialist to scan your systems and make sure that you are free from malware.
  • Real estate professionals who clicked on a link the text should promptly follow up with an IT specialist to ensure that their device is free from malware.
  • You can follow up with the FBI after filing the IC3 report with your local field office.

Rockport realtor receives National Association of Realtors certification

Paul F. Franklin of Re/Max At The Coast in Rockport was recently awarded the At Home with Diversity certification from the National Association of Realtors.

Franklin joins 25,000 other real estate professionals in North America who have earned the certification after completing an 8-hour course addressing topics of diversity, fair housing and business planning development. The program is designed to meet the nation’s fair housing commitment by educating and equipping NAR’s members with the tools they need to expand homeownership opportunities for the growing number of culturally diverse buyers and sellers in the housing market.

Prior to earning this certification, Franklin also earned the National Association of Realtors Green Designation after studying sustainable and eco-friendly building and homeownership practices in 2010.

For more information on the At Home with Diversity certification, visit http://bit.ly/2uWyMky. Franklin can be reached at Re/Max At The Coast at 978-239-2172 or pfranklin@remax.net.

5 Questions with Jessica Hickok of the Oklahoma Association of Realtors

Jessica Hickok, CEO of the Oklahoma Association of Realtors, works with 21 local associations in the state made up of more than 10,500 Realtors. MATT BARNARD/Tulsa World